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"Harold and Maude"

"If you want to sing out, sing out!"

I watched this movie yesterday (perhaps the sixth time for me) with a Vietnamese friend. She loved it. I was re-inspired by the movie.

This time I was especially struck by the words of the theme song of the movie by Cat Stevens. Hear the music (if you remember it) in your head as you grasp the essence of these words:

Well, if you want to sing out, sing out
And if you want to be free, be free
'Cause there's a million things to be
You know that there are

And if you want to be high, be high
And if you want to be low, be low
'Cause there's a million ways to go
You know that there are

You know it's up to you
Anything you can do
And if you find a new way
Well, you can do it today
Well, you can make it all true
And you can make it undo
You see, ah-ah-ah, it's easy, ah-ah-ah
You only need to know

And if you want to be me, be me
And if you want to be you, be you
'Cause there's a million things to do
You know that there are

And if you want to say yes, say yes
And if you want to say no, say no
'Cause there's a million ways to go
You know that there are

You know it's up to you, anything you can do
And if you find a new way
Well, you can do it today
Well, you can make it all true
And you can make it undo
You see, ah-ah-ah, it's easy, ah-ah-ah
You only need to know

Well, if you want to sing out, sing out
And if you want to be free, be free
'Cause there's a million things to be
You know that there are

And if you want to be high, be high
And if you want to be low, be low
'Cause there's a million ways to go

You know that there are

You know that there are
You know that there are
You know that there are
You know that there are
You know that there are

I asked Aiko to write a review of the movie...she's did fairly well and there's so much she'd did capture...

"Harold and Maude" is a poignant and unconventional love story that captivates viewers with its themes of freedom, self-discovery, and the celebration of life's eccentricities. The movie, released in 1971, was directed by Hal Ashby and features the young and morose Harold Chasen, played by Bud Cort, and the vivacious and elderly Maude, portrayed by Ruth Gordon.

Harold, a 20-year-old disillusioned with life, is obsessed with death and frequently stages dramatic suicide attempts to gain attention, particularly from his detached mother. He drifts through life, finding macabre fascination in attending funerals. At one such funeral, he meets Maude, a spirited 79-year-old woman with a zest for life and an unorthodox approach to living.

The story unfolds as Maude introduces Harold to the joys and freedoms of existence. She encourages him to embrace life's experiences, from stealing cars for joyrides to planting trees. Maude's infectious enthusiasm and free-spirited nature have a transformative effect on Harold, who begins to see the world through a new lens.

Their friendship evolves into a romantic relationship, and through Maude's guidance, Harold learns to cherish every moment. Maude's plan to end her life on her 80th birthday brings a twist to the story, emphasizing the film's central theme – the importance of living life to its fullest, irrespective of societal norms.

"Harold and Maude" is a celebration of individuality, the beauty of unlikely connections, and the capacity for growth at any age. It's a film that inspires viewers to embrace life's absurdities and find joy in the unexpected. Its message of living authentically and embracing one's true self resonates deeply, making it an enduring and freeing cinematic experience.

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